Anti-money Laundering

 
We have extensive experience in advising our clients on the application of anti-money laundering (AML) laws, including the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Act 2006 and accompany rules, as well as Australia’s sanctions laws. We also help our clients navigate anti-corruption laws when engaging in Australian and cross-border business transactions.

Members of our team also take an active leadership role in industry groups dealing with AML issues as they arise.

We can help you with the following:

  • Provide you with regulatory advice about the application of relevant laws;
  • Enrol you with AUSTRAC as a reporting entity, register as a provider of designated remittance services or register on the on the Digital Currency Exchange Register;
  • Draft or review anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing programs;
  • Draft or review AML and sanctions policies;
  • Conduct an independent review of Part A of anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing programs; and
  • Advise and represent you on regulator enforcement or surveillance activity.

Key contact

Harry New

Partner

Co-head of Investment Funds

Harry leads our financial services team and focuses extensively on financial services law and corporate advisory.

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